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DECENTRALIZED UNITS

Vision

Improved governance structures where citizens fully participate for effective development and service delivery  

Mission

To promote peaceful citizen participation in governance and planning urban centres for effective socio-economic development

Strategic goals/objectives of the Department

  • To provide an enabling environment for effective citizen participation in governance and for closer and efficient public service delivery.
  • To build community ownership of public institutions and self determination
  • To streamline security policy implementation processes through increased public participation
  • To create well planned urban centres offering all essential services with interlinking networks
  • To open up all urban centres for investments through structured infrastructural development.

Department and its Mandates

  • To co-ordinate citizen participation in governance, service delivery and development.
  • To undertake urban planning  activities and enforcement.
  • To provide interdepartmental linkages in public service delivery.
  • To provide supervisory role in delivery of public service and in development projects.
  • To co-ordinate with the national government in matters patterning to security as stipulated in the inter governmental relation Act 2013.

 

Water and Sanitation

Water Resources and Quality

The main water resources in Kwale County comprise of rivers (7), shallow wells (693), springs (54, protected and unprotected), water pans, dams (6), rock catchments and boreholes (110). However, most of the rivers are seasonal thus cannot be relied upon to supply the much needed water in the county for both agriculture and household uses.

Water Supply Schemes

Kwale Water and Sewerage Company is mandated by the Coast Water Services Board to supply/distribute, control and manage all the water supply schemes within the county. Private water service providers in liaison with the Kwale water services board have been supplying water to the community to ensure water is available for all. Other water supply schemes include community owned and managed boreholes, dams and even water pans. Local community participation in the projects has been poor, thus creating problems of operation and maintenance.

Water Sources

The main sources of water are boreholes, springs, dams, water pans and rock catchments. The average distance to the nearest water point in the County is two (2) Kilometres. This is well above the internationally required five (5) meters distance to the nearest water source. More stakeholders are called upon to contribute towards the provision of this important resource to improve the lives of majority of the population in the county through access to safe and clean water.

Sanitation

Latrine coverage is a key component as far as household sanitation is concerned. The main type of toilet facility in the County is the pit latrine accounting for 34.7 per cent of the total population in the County followed by uncovered pit latrine at 33.5 per cent. Generally, the latrine coverage in the County is at 41.4 per cent, which is below the national target of 90 per cent.

Political Units (Constituencies and County Assembly Wards)

Kwale County has four constituencies namely Matuga, Kinango Msambweni and Lunga Lunga. The county has twenty (20) County Assembly Wards as shown in Table 7 below.


Constituency

County Assembly Ward

Area (Km2)

Population (2009

MATUGA

TSIMBA GOLINI

178.70

34,002

WAA

114.00

37,783

TIWI

49.40

19,409

KUBO SOUTH

475.50

23,466

MKONGANI

213.60

37,318

TOTAL

1,031.20

151,978

KINANGO

 

 

 

 

CHENGONI/SAMBURU

697.50

32,641

NDAVAYA

555.90

27,816

PUMA

860.30

19,860

KINANGO

305.40

32,571

MACKINON ROAD

1105.60

31,128

MWAVUMBO

277.10

31,902

KASEMENI

209.90

33,642

TOTAL

4011.7

209,560

MSAMBWENI

GOMBATO BONGWE

55.70

34,846

UKUNDA

25.10

38,629

KINONDO

151.70

22,857

RAMISI

130.10

27,963

TOTAL

362.60

124,295

 

LUNGALUNGA

PONGWE/KIKONENI

346.00

51,842

DZOMBO

223.50

41,509

MWERENI

2040.40

34,628

VANGA

254.90

36,119

TOTAL

2,864.80

164,098

TOTAL

8,270.2

649,931


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Major challenges the Ministry faces

1.Pollution and waste management

Pollution of the environment especially related to land, water and air and poor waste management has led to adverse effects on animal and human health as well as the quality of the environment. Waste (solid, liquid and gaseous) which is primarily generated as a result of human activities is not well managed in Kwale county. A great deal of wastes generated is illegally dumped leading to physical accumulation or its discharge to fresh water as effluents. Waste management is a great challenge to the county due to the absence of appropriate technologies and modern facilities. Improper waste disposal has also enhanced land degradation and reduced the quality of the environment.

Urban centers (Ukunda, Kwale, Msambweni and Kinango) lack waste treatment systems and raw household or industrial waste is either discharged to cesspit which later sip to water sources or directly discharged to rivers, ponds and the Indian ocean. Collection and disposal of garbage is inconsistent and not well managed

2. Unreliable Water Supply

The persistent water shortage in Kwale County depresses agricultural output and income by inhibiting the adoption of irrigation techniques and watering systems for livestock. The lack of clean water increases occurrences of water-borne diseases and illnesses among the local population in most parts of the county. The unreliability of the water supply system is mainly occasioned by ageing infrastructure and delayed upgrades which are not in tandem with population trends and other socio-economic demands. Existing water systems are centred around urban/commercial centres which creates disproportionately low access and water portability in sparsely populated rural areas.
Household walk long distances to fetch water for domestic and economic uses. About 50 percent of the population leaving in rural areas access water from water sources that are more than 2 km away. In addition, in some areas where the water levels are too high, the water is contaminated through pit latrines. Along most settlements close to the Indian Ocean and in some of the semiarid areas the underground water is saline and hence not fit for domestic use.

 

Water Resources Based Development Projects

River Basin Projects

Irrigation projects and other water based projects are dependent on the main river drainage systems in the county. The county is well drained by seven major rivers and numerous minor streams. Of the seven (7) rivers, three (3) are permanent. The main rivers and streams are Ramisi, Marere, Pemba, Mkurumuji, Umba, Mwachema and the Mwachi River.  Exept for Ramisi and Mwachema rivers, the remaining have social and commercial uses related to domestic water, livestock and irrigation. 

Table: Projects along rivers basins

Name of River

Project

Project location

Project catchment area

Land tenure

Umba

Waga/Machame Irrigation projects for rice production-

Jego- Vanga

Irrigate 190 HA /
700 HH

Private land

 

Vichigini / Matoroni project for rice production -

Vanga

Irrigate 135 HA / 130 HH

Private

Mwache

Mwache dam project

Kasemeni

Domestic water for kinango sub-county

Public Land

Marere

Marere piped water project

Marere – Mombasa, Kwale and kinango

Domestic water supply

Public land

Pemba

Proposed irrigation project

Mteza, Mwaluganje, Tsunza

Irrigation

Public land

Mkurumudzi

Koromojo Dam for sugar irrigation, upper Koromojo

Msambweni, Nguluku/Maumba

Sugar Irrigation, Titanium processing

Private land

Ground Water reserves

Ground water potential is a function of rainfall and porosity of the underlying rock. Its quality is largely determined by the geology of the area. The coastal belt has a great potential of potable underground water with six main underground water catchments and/or reservoir. This includes the Tiwi catchment whose aquifer has a width of 20 Km2 and has a through flow of 42,000m2/hr. Others are the Msambweni catchment whose acquifer has a width of 42Km2 with a through flow of 27,440m3/hr. Further the Diani catchment has an aquifer that covers 19 Km2 with a through flow of 1400m3/hr. The Ramisi Catchment a very large catchment that reaches westward to include outcrops of the Duruma sandstone series. While the Mwachema catchment is also significant, it has low potential for fresh water due to increased clay content and sea water intrusion. Further, the Umba and Mwena catchment consists of the Duruma sandstone series, which is highly mineralized. Water in these catchments, therefore, is relatively saline.

Table: Projects that are determined by ground water reserves

Underground Aquifer

Project

Project location

Catchment area

Land tenure

Tiwi Aquifer

Augmentation of Tiwi Aquifers to serve Tiwi, Diani, Ukunda and proposed resort city

Tiwi

Tiwi, Diani, Ukunda and proposed resort city

Private/Public land

Msambweni Aquifer

Shallow wells and proposed Augmentation for supply to Ukunda and Msambweni. Irrigaation schemes

Magaoni, Msambweni

Ukunda and Msambweni

Public and private land

Ramisi Aquifer

Proposed domestic water supply and small scale iirigatio schemes

Ramisi, Mwangwei, Majoreni, shimoni

Ramisi, shimoni,

Public and private land

PROJECT 1: FOOD SECURITY INITIATIVE PROJECT

Project start date : July, 2013/14 End date June 2017

Located: County wide Project period 2013/14 :

Procurement of 20 tractors, 63 Tonnes of Cowpeas and 27 Tonnes of Green Grams for short rains,33 tonnes of PH4 and 17 tonnes of PH1 for the long rains; 600 tons fertilizer and 18 tons of stalk borer dust.

Implementation status for 2013/14: 100%

Social benefits: Food security and increase income at household level through improved land preparation, use of certified seeds, fertilizer and other farm inputs

seeds distribution
Launch of the 20 Tractors at the County HQ Tractor handover at the ward level

Seeds distribution to farmers

PROJECT 2: ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT AND FOOD SECURITY THROUGH LIVESTOCK DEVELOPMENT

Project start date : July, 2013/14 End date June 2017
Located: County wide

Implementation status: 100%
Duration :Project 2013/2014

Social benefits: Food security and Economic empowerment to livestock keepers through improved breeds, improved management and disease control, livestock diversification and improved market access.

cattle vaccination Launch goats
cattle vaccination Launch Goat improvement project(Meat goat bucks for distribution to community at Kinango ward

Dairy improvement project: Dairy cattle distributed to farmers at Golini/Tsimba war

PROJECT 3: ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT AND FOOD SECURITY THROUGH FISHERIES DEVELOPMENT

Project start date: July, 2013/14 End date June 2017

located: County wide

Implementation status:100%

Project 2013/2014: : provision of fishing accessories, provision of 2 rescue boats and construction of 16  fish ponds
Social benefits: economic empowerment and  food security through provision of fishing accessories, provision of rescue boats and construction of fish ponds

cattle vaccination Launch cattle vaccination Launch

Rescue boats boat purchased by the county government

Rescue boats boat purchased by the county government

Rescue boats boat purchased by the county government